Category Archives: ch 11

TowneSquare Media, LLC v. Brill (7th Cir.)

Justia.com Opinion Summary

Defendant owned companies forced into Chapter 11 bankruptcy, but was not a debtor in the proceedings. The plan was confirmed and prohibited suits against the bankruptcy professionals and certain litigation against pre-bankruptcy creditors. Years later defendant sued plaintiff, pre-judgment creditors, and the bankruptcy professionals in an Indiana state court, based on Indiana law. The creditors removed the suit to bankruptcy court (28 U.S.C. 1452(a)) rather than asking the bankruptcy judge to enforce his order. The statute authorizes removal of any claim of which that court would have jurisdiction under 28 U.S.C. 1334, which confers on the district courts original jurisdiction of all civil proceedings arising under the Bankruptcy Code, or “arising in or related to cases under” the Code. The bankruptcy judge determined that the suit against the bankruptcy professionals was barred. Defendant filed an amended complaint eliminating all defendants except plaintiff and stating that the only claims arose from alleged violations of confidentiality agreements. The bankruptcy judge ruled that, as amended, the complaint was unrelated to the bankruptcy and ordered the suit remanded to the state court. The district judge affirmed. The Seventh Circuit concluded that the dismissal was not subject to review.

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Reedsburg Util. Comm’n v. Grede Foundries (7th Cir.)

Justia Case Summaries

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Justia.com Opinion Summary:

Wisconsin smelting plant owed more than $1.3 million in delinquent utility charges to the local municipal utility when it filed for Chapter 11. Months later, despite the Automatic Stay, a utility company implemented a process pursuant to Wisconsin Statutes and Local Ordinances 66.0809 and 66.0627 by which the plant’s unpaid utility bills became a lien against the Debtor‘s property. Both the Bankruptcy and District Courts found that none of the exceptions to the Automatic Stay applied to make their actions. They were, in fact, a violation of the Stay.  The 7th Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed, holding that no exception to the Stay applied and the offending utility company creditor did not obtain a pre-petition security interest in the plant’s property by providing services or by giving notice in the form of billing. Finally, the 7th Circuit agreed with the District Court that the utility bills produced did not amount to a “tax or special assessment” that would have exempted them from the operation of the Stay.

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In re Louis Jones Enterprises, Inc. (Bkrtcy.N.D.Ill.)

Bankruptcy_court_logo

The Facts: Chapter 11 Debtor failed to segregate its employee’s wages and apply a portion toward a group health insurance premium. When those funds were seized later by a creditor, the employees left with a 5th priority wage claim and a lapsed insurance policy.

The Issue
: Employee alleged that the funds taken should be classified as a contribution to an employee benefit plan arising from services rendered within 180 days before the filing date of the case.

The Upshot: The Court agreed that the funds had been earned with the 180 days before the case was filed, and also ruled that employees also had an administrative expense claim for wages that were withheld but not applied during the post-petition. Finally, the Court ruled that employees had a claim for un-reimbursed medical expenses that would have been covered under the policy, had it not expired.

 

Harris v. Gander Partners (ND IL)

Harris N.A. v. Gander Partners LLC ,(N.D.Ill.)

Issue: When an LLC is in Chapter 11 reorganization, can a creditor collect directly from the principals of the company instead?

Answer: Apparently not in the Northern District of Illinois

Upshot: Here, the Court upheld an injunction entered by the Bankruptcy Court after determining that

  • The participation of these principles was essential to the company’s reorganization
  • If these principles were distracted by this lawsuit the reorganization would likely fail
  • Many other creditors would be harmed financially if this reorganization failed; and
  • The creditor seeking to collect only faced only a temporary stay, anyway.

In the immortal words of Spockcirca Star Trek IIthe needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few.

 

Trustee v. Penn Media, 03 A 01141

 

Bankruptcy:  In re marchFirst, Inc, 01 B 24742
Adversary: Trustee v. Penn Media, 03 A 01141
Opinion Issued: October 14, 2010
By;  The Hon. A. Benjamin Goldgar

Upshot: Trustee moves to recover a payment as part preference and part fraudulent transfer. Defendant, a creditor with which debtor did business, moves for summary judgment. Creditor/Defendant’s motion is granted as to the preference and denied as to the fraudulent transfer.

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Proposed Order Form

All motions and proposed orders presented on or after November 1, 2010 must include one of the following fillable “Proposed Order” forms

Form Order for use in bankruptcy case (rev. 10-08)

Form Order for use in adversary case    (rev. 10-08)

Questions, Comments, Suggestions? Use the “E-Order Feedback” tool provided by the Court on this page.

In re Exide Technologies, 08-1872

In re: Exide Technologies, 08-1872
Issued June 01, 2010
Heard in U.S. 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals
Summary In a Chapter 11 case, the District Court’s affirmance of the Bankruptcy Court’s grant of Debtor’s motion to reject an agreement to sell substantially all of its industrial battery business on the ground that the agreement was an executory contract, subject to rejection under 11 U.S.C. section 365(a), and that rejection terminated the debtor’s obligations under it, is vacated and remanded as: 1) the agreement is not an executory contract because it does not contain at least one ongoing material obligation for the other party; and 2) because the agreement is not an executory contract, the debtor cannot reject it. Read More